THE MOST SOUTH AFRICAN FOOD AND HOW THEY’RE MADE

Breyani:

this Indian traditional meal is incredibly popular in KwaZulu Natal, home of the South African Indian. It is composed of yellow rice, potatoes, several spices and meat or vegetables. It is incredibly spicy but incredible addictive.

Bunny chow:

this is another Indian meal. This, incredibly enough is found only in South Africa. Yeah, one cannot go to India and order a bunny. It is a quarter or half loaf of unsliced bread filled with chicken, mutton and sometimes beef curry.

Pap:

a South African staple in every home being Pap, a mealie meal based starch. Depending on the texture, it can be eaten as a breakfast in the form of porridge, or a replacement for rice in any meal and even combined with Maas as a meal on its own.

Braai meat:

in some countries, it is referred to as a barbeque. The word braai is understood by all South Africans and is a favourite, no matter which culture or ethnic group one is from. There is even a holiday that has been dedicated to the braai, National Heritage Day (24 September) is also known as National Braai Day, in celebration of our various heritages as well as the great tradition of a braai. In simple terms, a braai is done in a braai stand or in a pizza oven kind of cave. A fire is started using coal and firewood, once the coal has reached the maximum heat, a grill is placed on top and previously marinated meat is cooked on this fire. Braai meat is served with various salads and pap or rolls.

Maas:

otherwise known as sour milk is black traditional meal. It is literally sour milk that is eaten with phuthu/ mphokoqo, a derivative of pap. Some may replace phuthu with rice or broken up pieces of bread. Some add milk, cream or sugar to enhance the taste. And it usually served cold.

Tripe:

this is cow stomach and insides. It has a very strong smell but a long-lasting taste. This is usually fresh eaten at ceremonies, from the slaughtered cow. One could also buy some at your local butchery. It needs extensive washing as it contains sand. It is boiled with some salt and water until cooked. Onion and tomato may be added for flavour.

Biltong:

this is dried meat, usually from tough animals like beef and ostrich. Traditionally it would take a long time to dry the meat to biltong standard but technology has brought on biltong makers that shorten the process time. It is a well-loved snack across the ethnic backgrounds and is quite expensive. It is well worth the purchase.

Umqhavunyeko:

this Xhosa traditional meal consists of sugar beans (imbotyi) and mealies (umbona). It is well loved in winter as it is incredibly heart warming. These are meal that are traditionally cooked by a mother for her family.

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